ornithodire art references

up-to-date refs for dinosaur and pterosaur artists

elijahshandseight:

Kulindadromeus skeletal restoration. 
Does anybody know who is the author of the image?

elijahshandseight:

Kulindadromeus skeletal restoration. 

Does anybody know who is the author of the image?

albertonykus:

Tail feather arrangement of select Mesozoic maniraptors.

albertonykus:

Tail feather arrangement of select Mesozoic maniraptors.

albertonykus:

My guide to dinosaur hands is one of my most popular pieces, but it’s a little dated both artistically and scientifically. Here’s a long-overdue update!

albertonykus:

My guide to dinosaur hands is one of my most popular pieces, but it’s a little dated both artistically and scientifically. Here’s a long-overdue update!

kenbrasai:

Hypothetical Banguela oberlii skull by Jaime A. Headden.

kenbrasai:

Hypothetical Banguela oberlii skull by Jaime A. Headden.

(via pterosauria)

Quill Knob Articulation by Rebecca Spano
Dinosaur/pterosaur beak tutorial by Elijah Shandsheight:

Among the most common mistakes in depicting dinosaurs and pterosaurs is the wrong way in which we depict the beak. Coarsely you think that this structure (also known under the name of rhamphoteca) is a single keratinous structure that covers the end of the snout of the animal. Wrong. Looking closely we realize that it is actually composed of at least four main parts, which vary in complexity depending on the species. Here I want to illustrate the most basal kind of rhamphoteca using the ratites (i.e. the most primitive existing birds like the kiwi, ostrich and the cassowary) as a comparison and providing some tips. For the full post, visit my blog: [link]Coloured with Tria Markers. Species depicted (left to right): cassowary, Gallimimus, Triceratops, Geosternbergia (a.k.a. Pteranodon sternbergi).Blue - NarisYellow - Keratinous coveringsGreen - “Lips”Red - Real BeakReferences: Greg Paul, Will Svensen, Mike Hanson, You’re Doing It Wrong: Birds with Teeth and Theropods That Fit the Bill by Matt Martyniuk.Enjoy it!Ps: Sorry for the colours’ quality. Bad Scanner.

Dinosaur/pterosaur beak tutorial by Elijah Shandsheight:

Among the most common mistakes in depicting dinosaurs and pterosaurs is the wrong way in which we depict the beak. Coarsely you think that this structure (also known under the name of rhamphoteca) is a single keratinous structure that covers the end of the snout of the animal. Wrong. Looking closely we realize that it is actually composed of at least four main parts, which vary in complexity depending on the species. Here I want to illustrate the most basal kind of rhamphoteca using the ratites (i.e. the most primitive existing birds like the kiwi, ostrich and the cassowary) as a comparison and providing some tips. For the full post, visit my blog: [link]

Coloured with Tria Markers. Species depicted (left to right): cassowary, GallimimusTriceratopsGeosternbergia (a.k.a. Pteranodon sternbergi).

Blue - Naris
Yellow - Keratinous coverings
Green - “Lips”
Red - Real Beak

References: Greg Paul, Will Svensen, Mike Hanson, You’re Doing It Wrong: Birds with Teeth and Theropods That Fit the Bill by Matt Martyniuk.

Enjoy it!

Ps: Sorry for the colours’ quality. Bad Scanner.

prehistoric-birds:

vodzimir:

paleoartrefs:

Something to keep in mind: Archosaur hands only have claws on the three innermost digits (I-III).

For example, take a look at this left forepaw of a modern crocodilian:

image

(source)

Hannddss. Also helpful for giving other extant archosaurs (like birds) hand digits if need be. x: x: x:

Do note that hind limb digits vary, though; crocs continue the three-inner-digits-clawed rule, but birds do not. 

Feathered dinosaur digit identity is debatable, though there’s evidence that a mutation caused their digits II-IV to develop using the genetic information for digits I-III instead, hence the claws.

While we’re on the subject of exceptions to the rule, here’s a useful chart showing the finger configurations of different dinosaur groups. You can see that, for instance, hadrosaurs’ innermost fingers were enveloped in a weird fleshy pad without visible claws.

ETA: Whoops, I didn’t notice you said hind limbs. Oh well, this stuff’s useful anyway.

Something to keep in mind: Archosaur hands only have claws on the three innermost digits (I-III).

For example, take a look at this left forepaw of a modern crocodilian:

(source)

Microraptor zhaoianus skeletal by Ville Sinkkonen

Microraptor zhaoianus skeletal by Ville Sinkkonen